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In his book ‘Phantoms in the Brain‘, Dr. V.S. Ramachandran [1] describes the phantom limb syndrome observed in amputees. Patients suffering of this syndrome report the sensation that an amputated or missing limb (even an organ, like the appendix) is still attached to the body and is moving appropriately with other body parts.

The owner of this blog suffers from the severest form of the phantom syndrome – the brain itself has eroded steadily over the years, but sensation of the three pound jelly-like bundle of neurons, which by now has completely evaporated, still lingers on.

The ideas, comments, critiques and other ramblings posted on this blog are grand productions of this phantom brain.

[1] Dr. V.S. Ramachandran at TED.

In his book ‘Phantoms in the Brain’, Dr. V.S. Ramachandran describes the phantom limb syndrome observed in amputees. Patients suffering of this syndrome report the sensation that an amputated or missing limb (even an organ, like the appendix) is still attached to the body and is moving appropriately with other body parts.

The owner of this blog suffers from the highest degree of the phantom syndrome – the brain eroded years ago, leaving behind the sensations of the three pound jelly like object that once existed.

The ideas, comments, critiques and other ramblings posted on this blog are grand productions of this phantom brain.

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